Luxury Addict Tag

As a lover of luxury goods, evident within my previous luxury goods post, I thought it about time to publish my ‘Luxury Addict Tag’ post.

1. What was your first designer piece?

My buy-in luxury brands was the Australian label, Oroton.

From the ages of sixteen until eighteen (16-18), I accumulated a vast array of both bags and small leather goods (SLG’s) from the company. Luckily, Oroton have not deviated from their style roots, meaning my bags are still trendy and easily recognisable.

My first ‘international designer’ purchase was the Gucci GG Blooms Pouch (as pictured in Work Christmas Party Outfit).

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2. What do you consider your best investment?

In accordance with the cost-per-wear formula (described in Buying into IMG_3477.JPGLuxury?), my Louis Vuitton Speedy 35 in Damier Ebene has paid off exponentially. I use the traditional luggage piece as an everyday bag, a travel bag, an overnight bag and anything in between.

Whilst the Speedy is a common bag that near every Tom, Dick and Jane of the luxury community have, I appreciate the durability, the agreeable price point (in comparison to other bags) and how versatile the design is.

3. What is your criteria when looking to buy a piece?

Questions that I pose to myself when looking at a possible addition to my wardrobe, are as follows:

  1. Determine whether this item is a trend driven piece (if so, does the trend correspond with my long-term personal style?)
  2. How versatile is this piece and can it be worn with your current wardrobe?
  3. What are the main materials of the potential purchase? Personally if I am paying more than $500 for an item, it generally will have to be leather (with the obvious exception of the Speedy 35).
  4. How are the finishes of the item – is their attention to detail? is the stitching neat? is there fraying? how will the item wear over time?
  5. What or who inspired you to consider the item? If it is an individual who you idealise, are you merely interested because you appreciate their personal style?
  6. What will the cost-per-wear be?
  7. Does the item fit into your lifestyle? For example, my lifestyle does not allow for micro or small bags. As a result, it would be a waste to purchase smaller bags.
  8. Are you genuinely passionate about this item?
  9. Question whether you are merely interested in the item because of the brand? If you removed the logo, would you appreciate the raw design?

4. What has been your stupidest/most regrettable purchase?

$200 aud (two-hundred dollars)  for a gold-plated glass ring. Yes, I was foolish img-thingenough to spend that type of money for the Yves Saint Laurent Arty Ring.

In my defence, I purchased the ring as I knew demand for the discontinued ring would rise, so why not purchase the ring second-hand, from a reputable seller who was offering a receipt.

I distinctly recall being underwhelmed when I opened the postage box. Thankfully, I did not struggle to re-sell the ring, although I broke-even on the purchase.

My second most regrettable purchase was the Louis Vuitton Trunks Bandeau in Rose Poudre.

Whilst Bandeaus/Twillies are glorified in the luxury lovers community, I regret purchasing mine for the simple fact that I struggle to justify $220 aud (two-hundred and twenty dollars) on a strip of fabric.

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5. If you have sold any of your luxury goods, have you ever had sellers regret?

Yes. I hope to God that my mother never stumbles across this tag and reads this response, otherwise I will be instructed to move out.

I frequently list my luxury goods online to recycle my funds to newer and more desirable products. However, there was a huge error of judgement when I both listed and sold a Louis Vuitton backpack that my mother passed down to me. After purchasing the classic monogram bag from a second-hand store in the early 2000’s, my mother never used the bag. During a wardrobe clean-out, my mother gave me the bag to wear. Unbeknown to me, the bag was actually an authentic piece that retails on the luxury second hand market from $800-$2,000 aud. Unfortunately, I sold the piece at a slight fraction of that cost, with the belief that it was a replica piece.

Sorry mum.

I still kick myself about that decision. As a result, I ensure that I engage a certified authenticator before I sell luxury goods that are vintage, or purchased and resold on the second-hand market.
6. What is a piece that you think everyone needs/should have?

I am not a great believer in dictating what material goods people should or shouldn’t have, as luxury goods are just that – an opt-in, opt-out system.

However, I do strongly recommend hot-stamped leather goods, such as those from The Daily Edited (TDE) or Monpurse.

Whilst some may not see these small leather goods (SLG’s) as ‘luxury’, the concept of luxury is highly subjective. I personally conceptualise hot-stamped leather goods as luxury items, as you would not be hard pressed to find similar items, that are of similar quality (without inscriptions) at a significantly lower price. My previous blog post, titled Personalising a Trend: Monogram, further details why monogram leather should be on every luxury lover’s radar.

7. What is a piece that you think is over-hyped?

I echo the sentiments of near all YouTubers and bloggers who have answered this question – anything that is commonly peddled by bloggers and online influencers tend to be over-hyped.

The Gucci Dionysus, Celine Trio and Chloe Faye are some examples of bags I would veer away from.

Further, I would not recommend investing in Louboutin. I struggle to reconcile a designer who openly affirms that these expensive shoes are not to be worn frequently. On the basis of both comfort and your hip-pocket – veer away.

 

 

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